Facebook is asking for nude photos to fight revenge porn

Facebook asks users to upload nudes to fight revenge porn

Facebook wants users to share their nude photos with it as it fights revenge porn

The social network has developed an anti-revenge porn system that uses artificial intelligence to recognise and block specific images, and is testing it in the UK, US, Canada and Australia.

Grant sought to allay concerns of users about what Facebook would do with the photos they upload.

The publication reports that Australia is one in four countries taking part in this "cutting-edge technology". But it begs the question, how many people are going to send nude photos to the government, and what will a government and a multinational company do with this database of photos?

Facebook began using the hashing technique to identify explicit images that had been reported to prevent them from being re-shared in April 2017 - the trial takes the approach one step further, attempting to thwart the photos being posted in the first place.

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In fact, Facebook's idea is to act before time since by posting the nude image the user can have the guarantee of him or her getting saved from being featured in any porn material that might depict them in future. If you fear that you're a potential victim, you can contact e-Safety who might ask you to send your pictures to yourself on Messenger. Well, share your nude photo first with Facebook.

Facebook is now testing the system - starting in Australia, but spreading to other parts of the world - but it's not really clear how willing potential revenge porn victims will be to go along with the scheme.

"I literally recover deleted images from computer systems all day - off disk and out of system memory".

A team of specially trained representatives from Facebook's community operations team will then review the image to decide whether it should be taken down.

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If it works, then the photo or video will never show up on Facebook, even if a hacker or an ex-partner tries to upload it.

"It would be like sending yourself your image in email, but obviously this is a much safer, secure end-to-end way of sending the image", Grant said. The answer is-revenge porn. Roughly four percent of United States internet users have been victims of revenge porn, according to a 2016 Data & Society Research Institute report.

That way, your photo will never show up on any of Facebook's servers.

Facebook is no stranger to revenge porn and explicit content, which is banned on the platform.

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